Locusts Attack In India As Residential Areas Turning Sky Black

A locust plague swarmed across India and coursed through built up towns. Footage shows a surge of insects covering the sky and forcing the villagers to run for shelter.

A man, who filmed the moment, can be heard behind the camera:

“There are billions and trillions. There are uncountable numbers of locusts flying in the sky, this is something I have never ever seen in my life.” He then turns the camera to a roof floor which has changed colour by a mass of millions of the insects.

In a short while, the locusts cover an entirely stairway, went on to ravage plants and send the agricultural workers into a frenzy. Millions of locusts blanketed the sky during the second plague in Jaipur, India, which took place on May 25.

A local emergency was reportedly declared in the city and in nearby agricultural areas of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh.

Officials have been spraying insecticides on crops to ward off the ravenous pests.

The locust has been identified as the Desert Locust and are said to have migrated from Pakistan to India after destroying their crops.

There are around 10 locust attacks or swarms in the country every year, with each following the monsoon winds.

The insect, which is a short horned grasshopper, is unique in its ability to change behaviour and work with mates to swarm and forage for food.
A typical swarm can be made up of 150 million locusts per square kilometer and is carried on the wind, up to 150 km in one day.

A one-square kilometer swarm can eat the same amount of food as 35,000 people in a day.

Swarms of locust attack in the walled city of Jaipur, Rajasthan, Monday, May 25, 2020. More than half of Rajasthans 33 districts are affected by invasion by these crop-munching insects.(Photo by Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

A man hold locust during the swarms of locust attack in the residential areas of Jaipur, Rajasthan, Monday, May 25, 2020. More than half of Rajasthans 33 districts are affected by invasion by these crop-munching insects.(Photo by Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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